Has lockdown boosted your savings?

Here’s what you could do with your money…

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As each week passes, we edge closer and closer to normal life.

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Shops have re-opened, restaurants are serving food indoors again. And with more welcome changes on their way, lockdown will hopefully soon feel like a distant memory.

It’s safe to say lockdown wasn’t easy. But arguably, some of us noticed a few surprising flipsides. The slower pace of life. Having more time to appreciate the little things.

In fact, two thirds of the nation have spent less money overall since March 2020, Fidelity research shows. This comes down to things like not going on holiday, not eating out and not meeting friends and family. Even working from home has proved cost-effective.*

And despite the eagerly awaited lift on Covid restrictions in June, UK adults are expected to save a collective £180 billion by this summer, according to the Office for Budget Responsibility.^

Save, spend or invest?
Many of us have aspirations about the future that we might have thought were just out of reach. But the money you’ve saved over lockdown may actually help towards accomplishing them. Now could be a really good time to think about how these savings could change your future – and where might be the best place for it.

Keeping it in a regular cash account probably feels like the easiest solution. Of course, this is the perfect home for short-term goals. But for bigger, longer-term financial needs, there are other options that could give you a better chance of achieving higher returns.

How could your money go further?
When it comes to your future goals, investing could be considered one of the best ways to help you grow your money.

You do have to be willing to take some risk to your capital (in return for a chance of higher rewards), and you should also be intending to invest for at least five years.

There are so many investment options out there – each with different levels of risk. Planning with an expert can help you decide on the ones you feel most comfortable with, that better matches your individual needs.

Here to make life easier
When it comes to knowing what’s best for your savings, it isn’t always easy. In fact, these can be tricky decisions.

Our financial advice partner, Skipton Building Society are here to help you strengthen your financial plans. They could review your arrangements and provide personalised recommendations – setting you on the right path towards reaching your goals.

Simply tell them your situation, what’s important to you – and they’ll aim to help you work out options for your money, that suit your unique circumstances and goals. They’ll provide clear explanations – and there’s absolutely no pressure to act.

What you do next is completely up to you – and you’ll be given all the time you need to make a decision. Not only that but, with their advice, you don’t have to pay an upfront fee. A charge will only apply if you choose a recommendation.

Skipton’s recommendations are likely to include stock market-based investments. These are not like bank and building society savings accounts as your capital is at risk and you may get back less than you invested. The value of your investments and any income from them may fall as well as rise.

Call Skipton today for a no-obligation consultation on 0345 266 0979 or find out more here 

*Source: How will you make the most of your lockdown savings? (fidelity.co.uk)
^Source: https://obr.uk/download/economic-and-fiscal-outlook-march-2021/

Skipton no pressure promise
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Radio Time’s financial advice service is provided by Skipton Building Society. Skipton is a member of the Building Societies Association, authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority under registration number 153706 to accept deposits, advise on and arrange mortgages and provide Restricted financial advice. Principal office: The Bailey, Skipton, North Yorkshire BD23 1DN. If you take advice from Skipton Building Society, Radio Times will receive a fee for the introduction.